What do cubs do?

Cubs is the second section of the Scouting movement, originally started in 1916 for younger brothers who wanted a ‘look-in’. In nearly a century, the section has constantly evolved and adapted its programme and methods to meet the changing needs of each generation of young people, girls and boys.

Cubs meet on Tuesdays at 6:30pm to 8.00pm

Introduction

Cub Scouting began in 1916, and has gone from strength to strength ever since. Currently there are somewhere in the region of 140,000 Cubs in nearly 8,000 Packs! Many Cub Scouts will have been Beaver Scouts, but some will join Scouting for the first time as Cubs looking for fun, adventure and friendship.

Who is Cub Scouting for?

Cub Scouts is open to young people aged between eight and ten and a half years old who want to join and can make the Cub Scout Promise.

The Cub Scout Promise Scouting differs from many organisations in that it requires its Members to make a Promise, the wording for Cub Scouts is slightly simpler than that of the Scout Promise. It is:

I promise that I will do my best

to do my duty to God and to the Queen,

to help other people

and to keep the Cub Scout Law.

Different wordings of the Promise are available for those of different faiths who may prefer not to use the word ‘God’ and for those with special needs and circumstances.

By making the Promise a young person becomes a Member of the worldwide Movement; they become a Scout.

The Cub Scout Law

Every Cub should know their Cub Scout Law, put simply it is something they should try to remember in their everyday lives. The Cub Scout Law is:

Cub Scouts always do their best,

think of others before themselves

and do a good turn every day.

The Motto

The motto for all Members of the Movement is: Be Prepared.

The Cub Scout Uniform

Cub Scouts wear a green sweatshirt. They will also wear a scarf (sometimes called a “necker”), the colour of which varies from Scout Group to Scout Group. They will also have a woggle, to keep their scarf up. The woggle will normally be of the colour of the six they are in (see below on how Cub Scouts are organised). There are many other items of optional uniform.

An Introduction to the Cub Scout Section

How are Cub Scouts organised?

Wolf Cubs, as they were originally called in 1916, used Rudyard Kipling’s story The Jungle Book as their theme. Some Packs continue to do this today. They use characters and events as an inspiration for the names of Leaders (such as Akela for the Cub Scout Leader) and activities. Cub Scouts meet together as a Pack and work within a variety of small groups called “Sixes”. A team of adults will run the Cub Scout Pack, usually led by an Akela. Some will be Uniformed Leaders, others may be informal Assistants or helpers. Explorer Scouts who are Young Leaders might also assist the Leadership team in the Pack.

Investiture

Making the Promise is the most important act in Scouting and is common to every Section. Scouting has a special ceremony for making the Promise called Investiture or being invested. When a young person makes their Promise they receive their Group Scarf and the Membership Award or their Moving-On Award and are welcomed as a new Member into the Scout Family.

What do Cubs do?

Cubs take part in a wide range of activities that are designed to be interesting and to challenge them. At the same time they have fun, adventure and make friends along the way. They do this through taking part in a programme of activities provided by the Leadership team such as: camping, playing games, trying new things and exploring the outdoors.

Cub Scout Programme

Every Cub Scout participates in a Balanced Programme over a period of time. This ensures that all young people experience a quality programme covering a wide range of subjects. To help, the Balanced Programme is divided into a number of Programme Zones and Methods to ensure Cubs develop in all the Personal Development Areas.

Cubs do a wide range of activities, including the occasional camp.  Activities range from arts and crafts to climbing and abseiling to kayaking and sailing – we like to give the cubs an experience of the adventure that scouting has to offer!

Our programme is carefully planned according to the “Balanced Programme” philosophy that scouting promotes in order to provide a wide range of activities and experiences.

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